The Weekend Warrior

The Weekend Warrior

There is no denying the benefits of exercise. As we try to balance work and life, weekend warrior has been born. So, what is a weekend warrior? The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines it as ‘A person who participates in a usually physically strenuous activity only on weekends or part-time’.

There have been several studies stating the increase of injuries with weekend warriors. Here are some things you can do to reduce the occurrence of injuries and have a safe and effective workout.

1. Proper Biomechanics: biomechanics is the science of movement of the body, including how muscles, bones, tendons and ligaments work together to produce movement. Biomechanics is part of the larger field of kinesiology, specifically focusing on the mechanics of movement. Having good biomechanics means moving your body in proper alignment, while placing limited stress on the body. As we tire with exercise, we tend to get lazy or unaware, and our alignment and posture is affected. Effects of poor biomechanics may include compensatory changes and overuse injuries. To avoid this be sure to exercise with proper technique, awareness, posture, and education.

2. Stretching: benefits of stretching include increasing range of motion and flexibility. The American College of Sports Medicine recommends stretching a muscle at least 2 days a week. With a static stretch (the position in which a slight stretch is felt) should be held 15-30 seconds, and each stretch should be repeated 3-5 times on both sides of the body. There should be no pain nor should the joint be taken past the normal range.

3. Massage: how massage can help the Weekend Warrior:
▪ improves range of motion and tissue flexibility
▪ reduces of muscle cramps, spasms, and trigger points
▪ increases circulation and removal of lactic acid
▪ decreases swelling
▪ reduces pain

Have a great weekend and don’t forget to stretch!

Katherine Batho, RMT

References:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4035407/

http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/39/6/324.full

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3273886/

http://www.acsm.org/public-information/articles/2012/02/02/improving-your-flexibility-and-balance